Do NASA's observations rebut the Greens rhetoric?

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#81
We are looking at the introduction of European diseases to Aboriginals as though it was a deliberate case of biological warfare. It wasn't. Don't forget that those early European immigrants had as much knowledge of the microbial causes of disease as did the Aborigines. I'm sure that if we were time-traveled back to Sydney Cove in 1819, we'd be retching within a few minutes as we mixed with the Great Unwashed. It wasn't until the work of Pasteur in the 1850's that the germ theory of disease took over from the ancient miasma theory that disease was caused by "bad air" arising from rotting material. Vaccination for Small Pox was carried out in England from around the time of the First Fleet, but it is unlikely that the Lower Classes would have had access to it, or were convinced of its value.

The Aborigines had their own pharmacopoeia using naturally occurring plant-based chemicals. 40,000+ years of isolation didn't let them experience diseases like tuberculosis, Small Pox (and other minor poxes) and the STDs. It wasn't until 1980 that Small Pox was said to have been eradicated, but I bet it still lurks somewhere. In Australia we had a program to eradicate tuberculosis. There are around 1200 to 1300 cases of tuberculosis each year, which means we are among the lowest-risk countries in the world. People who were born and grew up in Australia are very unlikely to get TB, unless they have close contact with a sick person. The low humidity and heat of our climate help kill off the TB germ in the environment. The people most at risk of TB in Australia are those who have spent their early years of life in countries with high rates of the disease. The arrival of immigrants from those countries is the reason we can't eradicate the disease here.
 

pmccarthy

Well-Known Member
#82
We have a giant snake near us that is made of granite stones and runs over a hill. It is about 300m long and has a head of stone. Researchers here believe it was built to appease a god at the time of smallpox around 1820-30.
 

coljones

Well-Known Member
#83
We are looking at the introduction of European diseases to Aboriginals as though it was a deliberate case of biological warfare. It wasn't. Don't forget that those early European immigrants had as much knowledge of the microbial causes of disease as did the Aborigines. I'm sure that if we were time-traveled back to Sydney Cove in 1819, we'd be retching within a few minutes as we mixed with the Great Unwashed. It wasn't until the work of Pasteur in the 1850's that the germ theory of disease took over from the ancient miasma theory that disease was caused by "bad air" arising from rotting material. Vaccination for Small Pox was carried out in England from around the time of the First Fleet, but it is unlikely that the Lower Classes would have had access to it, or were convinced of its value.

The Aborigines had their own pharmacopoeia using naturally occurring plant-based chemicals. 40,000+ years of isolation didn't let them experience diseases like tuberculosis, Small Pox (and other minor poxes) and the STDs. It wasn't until 1980 that Small Pox was said to have been eradicated, but I bet it still lurks somewhere. In Australia we had a program to eradicate tuberculosis. There are around 1200 to 1300 cases of tuberculosis each year, which means we are among the lowest-risk countries in the world. People who were born and grew up in Australia are very unlikely to get TB, unless they have close contact with a sick person. The low humidity and heat of our climate help kill off the TB germ in the environment. The people most at risk of TB in Australia are those who have spent their early years of life in countries with high rates of the disease. The arrival of immigrants from those countries is the reason we can't eradicate the disease here.
The Aboriginal pharmacopoeia didn't have preventatives against gunshot wounds, poison, grog or refined sugar and flour either.
 
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