I knew I liked the French!

Bruce

Well-Known Member
#21
George Moffat ( he became world champion ) learned to fly gliders in France and he was taken aback when they all stopped at noon to have a dinner, with wine, before continuing flying.
For myself, one day I was getting ready to service the car in the hangar when this CASA guy arrived. He had a clip-board and an alcohol tester. He said that although he could see I wasn't about to fly, could he test me anyway on account of how he had to fill in this form a bit.
He was actually quite a nice bloke, so I agreed and he found that I was zero at 9am.
A poor use of government money, thought I.
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#23
The French have a great relationship with wine. They don't tend to abuse it like the anglophone countries. Kids grow up having a tiny glass of wine with meals, so when they hit 18 they don't feel the need to go on a bender.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#24
Anglos, Particularly Australian ones and the Germans are noisy and drink to get off their tiny brain. To the French, it's an adjunct to their meal. Italians to a point, likewise. Looking back on it we drank excessively. specially in places like Darwin and PNG. where it's HOT and humid and an airconditioned bar was better than being "outside".. All the expats insisted on it or you were considered very "different". I've always preferred wine to most Beers and copped a fair bit of flak until it became fashionable.. .Nev
 

Bruce

Well-Known Member
#25
This French chef was in a good wine commercial, he said " I use this wine for cooking... sometimes I even put a little in the food"
 

Bruce

Well-Known Member
#26
There have been a few cultures which traditionally drank beers and spirits. ( China and the US are just 2 examples ) . When they are introduced to wine, they gradually change over and never go back. The only exception is my son-in-law who steadfastly prefers boutique beers and bourbon. Yes he is from the US and he likes guns too... actually he's a nice bloke and can't help his culture.
 

coljones

Well-Known Member
#29
Good drunks are well practised in camouflaging their addiction and intoxication. Just because they appear sober doesn't mean they are not drunk.
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#31
Most cultures have the harder stuff in addition to beer & wine. The French have cognac for example - schnapps & a bunch of other lovely spirits for the Germans, vodka for the Russians, ouzo for the Greeks, slivovic for the Croats, gin for the Poms, whiskey for the Scots & Irish, saki for the Japanese... that's just off the top of my head, I reckon you'd be hard pressed to find an established region without a favourite tipple. Well apart from the Middle East for obvious reasons.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#32
THEY get into it when they are away from HOME...Don't worry. But actually alcohol is doing a lot of damage to our society and to our health. IF you have difficulty going dry for a half week you are probably an alcoholic Its GOT you mate. Lets be honest...
Some Countries drink so excessively that they are over double the limit here, all the time. They are so accustomed to it that that level of alcohol is normal. and you don't actually act drunk.. If you give it up say for a month and go back on it a few beers and you are away. with the fairies. You are a two pot screamer for a while. Nev
 
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PA.

Well-Known Member
#33
I was chatting with a Surgeon the other day at the Qantas Club. He said he felt terrible. I inquired why he felt so terrible and said he was allergic to being sober.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#35
". IF you have difficulty going dry for a half week you are probably an alcoholic Its GOT you mate"
IT IS A problem. Who Likes throwing Beer down the sink !,
I drink so much it goes OFF ?, ( I didn't taste it), But IF I buy a six pack for some occasion, It could be over six months & still sitting in the fridge, (all five bottles)
That makes that One drink expensive !.
Iv'e started to drink a little wine (you-know a bottle a year), LoL
spacesailor
 

pmccarthy

Well-Known Member
#36
I have taken a month off after a strict dressing down by the doc, but I go back to enjoying a glass or four each night. So I know I can stop if I want to for a night or two or a month, but I don’t usually. So does that make me an alcoholic or someone who just knows how to enjoy an evening?
 

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#38
There's the flip side to suffering from alcoholism, that's tee-totalism. By choice, I didn't drink for close on thirty years, just about all through my working life. As a result, I have no social life with others. I didn't mix with colleagues after work; didn't join registered clubs; didn't go to pubs. My father-in-law enjoyed good wines. I never joined him in a sampling. Even in response to our wedding toast, I did not drink. The day I retired, I had a celebration dinner with my family, and had the first drink they had ever seen me have. It was quite a shock to them. Now I still rather drink tea or coffee for refreshment. I enjoy sipping a glass of wine after dinner, and may have a schooner if I have a meal out.

In the Anglo-Irish Australian culture declining to drink alcohol is social suicide.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#39
Can you ever solve the world's problems in discussion with drunks?. IF you haven't noticed most don't make their best and most intelligent conversation pissed. There's also the difficult BAD drunk who will just take objection to you and hit you straight out of the blue.. Best you spend time with people who have some control over what they drink as there's a serious risk where it gets out of control.. Most objectional social behavior is alcohol fueled.. Alcohol destroys a lot of lives.. IF you are drinking every night of the week you are probably technically an alcoholic.. Sorry but I took a while to look seriously at the symptoms and I would have been one along with most of the people who I mixed with. Fortunately I don't get violent as many do. Most people I know whose kids have been king hit, without warning it's in an alcohol saturated environment. IF they DON'T GO there , they avoid the risk. It's that simple. You aren't missing out on anything important. you save money and don't have a headache next day and can remember what you did the night before.. Nev
 

red750

Well-Known Member
#40
I have never drunk enough to feel the effects as I don't particularly like the taste of any, some more than others. I agree with O.M.E. that you have no social life. When in a situation where it might be diplomatic to have a drink in your hand, I will have a brandy and dry or brandy and coke, but only one on any occasion. I have been given a Scotch, but put it down after two sips. As for wine, I don't mind Moselle, but again only one glass. When I lived in Adelaide I went with a group to a wine tasting at McLaren Vale. I didn't mind a sauterne, but not enough to buy a bottle. Don't like Chardonnay, Champagne or any red wine. I worked as a drink waiter at a wedding reception centre for a while. I didn't mind a 'fluffy duck', but that's a sweet woman's drink. And beer is a no-no. Years since I've had any alcohol. Give me a coffee or a lemonade. When we eat at my son's pub, we drink pub squash.
 
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