I knew I liked the French!

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#41
Have it as an adjunct to a meal as the French do and it's fine. Drink to get drunk and you are an addict. or have a problem of some kind that alcohol won't usually fix.. Drinking a lot of alcohol is a problem not a solution.... to anything. In Australia there is a pressure to drink, But it's considerably less than it once was.. I just drink soda and bitters or get soda and squeeze a lemon into it with ice.. Have better wine, but less quantity when the meal is good enough to merit it, and you can afford it. Eating out is not often for me. Nev
 
Last edited:

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#42
Don't get me wrong. I like the taste of wine and beer. During my non-drinking years, I would drink a non-alcoholic beer produced by Coopers when I was really hot and thirsty. I tried some non-alcoholic wine, but at that stage wasn't into wine drinking. Now I will have a glass after dinner, when I bother to pick one up from Aldi. I can't see the point is paying heaps for a wine when my palate is not trained enough to enjoyed the supposed pleasures of a special bottling. If I go out, I'm the one driving, and since I rely on my licence to earn a shekel or three, I can't afford to lose it to booze.

The last time I got shikkered was a few Christmases ago in England. I allowed myself to be plied with Bucks Fizz. Apparently I was the source of much entertainment.
 

octave

Well-Known Member
#43
Apparently, Australian are drinking much less alcohol than in the past. I definitely drink less than I used to. I share 1 or 2 bottles of wine a week with the wife (she is a keeper because she only likes a small glass). I also enjoy good quality craft beer (yes I am a pretentious wanker). When she and I go to a beer establishment we tend to get a tasting flight and spend a lot of time discussing the merits of the various offerings and then we may buy a schooner each of the one we like the best. The idea of drinking 8 pints of Fosters does not appeal at all. Craft beer at $15 a schooner is to be savoured and discussed not necked.
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#44
I've got to admit there's some excellent craft beers out there. Don't often go out but when I do, I'll try something other than the standard Boags or Cascade (although I like both). Can't drink to excess though - 3 or 4 pints tends to make me want to go home and have a lie down...
 

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#45
There are probably several reasons for Australians drinking less - RBT, travel time, home cold storage

RBT has definitely lowered the average Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) of drivers tested.
People no longer work within walking distance of home, or have short travel times from work to home.
The family fridge now holds much more that those of the past. That means there's room for a few beverage containers which wasn't there before. Also many now can run a "beer fridge" in the garage. Now we can have our coldies at home without the danger of getting into large 'shouts'.

Over consumption of alcohol is an activity of youth. Between 16 and 25 young people drink large amounts in social settings. By their mid-twenties, they tend to settle down to attend to steady relationships and careers. Mind you, we don't know what the Millenials are going to do.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#46
The thing IS.
"Over consumption of alcohol is an activity of youth. Between 16 and 25 young people drink large amounts in social settings. By their mid-twenties, they tend to settle down to attend to steady relationships and careers"
When you get that retirement age, your income doesn't leave much for booze. & no social parties.
spacesailor
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#48
Debatable !.
Grand-son's Bing drink, with their mates.
So a bottle in the weekend, Big bottle of JD that is.
I don't like it at all. even if his mates ALL do it. ( not just one)
grand-daughters do it at events they save up to go to.
spacesailor
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#49
In general the trend is downwards. Doesn't mean there won't be groups that still drink heavily (I also used to take a bottle of JD to parties in my 20's) but overall it's decreasing.
 

kgwilson

Active Member
#50
After I have cleaned up the yard and mowed the lawn late on a hot humid Saturday & I am hot & sweaty, there is nothing like sitting back on the Patio with a glass of cold craft beer made by me at home. I haven't been to a pub in years other than for a meal & I had a glass of a very nice Marlborough Savignon Blanc for my 69th birthday lunch, the first in months. I like good quality craft beers, my favourite style being India Pale Ale and my own home brewed ales. I always keep some IPA or PA in the garage for the times someone comes who won't try my home brew. That's only happened once as everyone else has said yes (some reluctantly) but everyone has been very complimentary afterwards. I have 4 bottles of Tower 10 IPA by Karl Strauss left from the 6 pack I bought last August.

I probably drank excessively when I was young but hated getting drunk. The hangover just wasn't worth it. I can't stand any of the popular beers they sell at pubs and bottle shops. Totally devoid of real flavour with too much gas & little hoppy bitterness & no finish.
 

old man emu

Well-Known Member
#51
In general the trend is downwards. Doesn't mean there won't be groups that still drink heavily (I also used to take a bottle of JD to parties in my 20's) but overall it's decreasing.
That's what I was getting at when I said, "Over consumption of alcohol is an activity of youth." Young and single means that you don't have the financial and moral duties of family life. As soon as a bloke settles down, everyone expects him to buckle down. Occasional letting off of steam is permitted, but once it becomes too frequent, then the slippery slide has been climbed.

When a couple gets to the Darby and Joan stage of life, there's more time for appreciating foods, including wines and beers, and exploring new types. With exploring as the driver, binge drinking doesn't get a seat.
 

coljones

Well-Known Member
#52
There's the flip side to suffering from alcoholism, that's tee-totalism. By choice, I didn't drink for close on thirty years, just about all through my working life. As a result, I have no social life with others. I didn't mix with colleagues after work; didn't join registered clubs; didn't go to pubs. My father-in-law enjoyed good wines. I never joined him in a sampling. Even in response to our wedding toast, I did not drink. The day I retired, I had a celebration dinner with my family, and had the first drink they had ever seen me have. It was quite a shock to them. Now I still rather drink tea or coffee for refreshment. I enjoy sipping a glass of wine after dinner, and may have a schooner if I have a meal out.

In the Anglo-Irish Australian culture declining to drink alcohol is social suicide.
just tell them you have a gut problem and you have to drink mineral water. That will allow you to spend all afternoon down at the rowing club admiring the harbour and the flights overhead heading to mascot. You don't get drunk, you don't gain weight, you don't stuff up your diabetes, you don't fart and your mouth doesn't taste like the bottom of a cocky's cage.
 
Top Bottom