Where is Townsville?

Litespeed

Well-Known Member
#22
As soon as the dam started rising, they should have realised it would keep coming and started to release water.

To do anything else is pure negligence.
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#24
Nearly an impossible task to get right. Whatever is done, someone will think it's the wrong thing. If it never overflows it's done the flood mitigation thing. Once it's full it's as if it's not there unless there's a safety element, (structural). The Hume Weir near Albury became unsafe a few years ago. If these things let go it's a catastrophe, you wouldn't want to think about. It's pretty easy to criticise decisions until you must make them yourself and most of us are not aware of the precise situation these people are addressing. The Papers sell "sensation" for profit. Truth is not allowed to get in the way of a GOOD Story, as you will find out when you are involved with something that "Makes the Headlines" the MAKES has a double meaning. .Nev
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#25
It's Not the decision to open the gates but the time.
IF opened the day (or more) before, it would have been a lesser Flood, as it was opened too late & too much, ( the Dam hight going down ).
The Hight of the dam could be adjusted according to Keeping the Hight stationery, & not lowering that vast expanse of water.
I',m not there so only going on news coverage.
spacesailor
 

Cosmick

Active Member
#26
There is an operators manual for each Dam. It advises what percentage opening on the gates at various levels. As the operator you follow the Manual to the letter otherwise YOU will be held personally responsible for loss of property or life as a consequence of deviating from the Manual. Remember the debarkle surrounding this subject with Wyvanhoe Dam during the Brisbane floods.
 

Yenn

Well-Known Member
#27
the Wivenhoe debacle was caused by the manual not being good enough and also wilful disregard of the consequences.
The current Townsville problem will be blamed on the met office not predicting the "unprecedented" rainfall. They could have started releasing a couple of days or so earlier, but I suppose they thought the rain would stop and they could store the water for use in the dry.
I live downstream of Awoonga Dam and a few years ago the powers that be started panicking. The water was 18m over the spillway, at which stage a saddle dam should have given way, letting water down an alternative route, but it didn't, so the level could get high enough to breach the dam. We were advised to evacuate and go to Boyne or Tannum, which is at the mouth of the river. I preferred to stay and evacuate if the water got near us. It was about 1.5m below the house at the highest, but it flooded parts of Boyne and Tannum
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#28
When something is in the order of once in hundreds of years, it's pretty rich to blame forecasters for not predicting it. What should be looked at is developing reclaimed swamps and soaks as suburbs. Better to leave as farm or parks. But the almighty dollar dictates it be developed.. Insurance costs go through the roof. Everyone pays.. The developers pocket the profits and get ready to do it somewhere else. Long term locals know the BAD areas but are never listened to .. . Nev
 

Yenn

Well-Known Member
#29
Not only the use of swamps as subdivisions, but also the trend to build Melbourne style slab on ground boxes with no eaves and also too many to the hectare.
One thing which makes flooding more and more likely is the speed of rainfall run off. The more heoses per hectare and the more sealed roads and driveways, the more water to run off per unit of time.
I would assume that drainage systems in Townsville would be designed to cope with 200mm per hour rainfall. That rate would result in Melbourne disappearing under water I haven't heard anything about flooding in Ingham, but a few years ago I was there and horrified to see a new subdivision in low ground with houses on the ground. I predicted then that they would flood and wonder what really happened.
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#30
Funny thing is, while we're talking about one-in-a-hundred year events happening every couple of years, no one in the government thinks that climate change has anything to do with it.

Fools.
 

spacesailor

Well-Known Member
#31
"The developers pocket the profits and get ready to do it somewhere else. Long term locals know the BAD areas but are never listened to .. . Nev"

And the next Biggy in Sydney will be MASCOT.!
All those Acres, & house plots at 500 squares max, makes $ Billions for the DEVELOPERS then the ripoff Rates to the council.
spacesailor
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#32
The Council will need the money for depression and suicide counselling, safe houses, extra police, psychiatrists CCTV and loudspeakers.. Streets named after aspirational concepts like, Closet Close, Divorced Court, Effluent Road and Persistent Drive all the way past Notso-Down Downs and the Twilby Mine, to the waters edge at Point Less. .Nev
 

Yenn

Well-Known Member
#33
While driving to the airstrip this morning I heard that Sydney got 56mm of rain and there was flooding.
How I would like 56mm of rain, preferably spread out over 2 hours and it would be just great. So far we have had no "wet " at all. I have never known a year when the rain hadn't started by Feb 1st.
 
#34
yenn being a farming contractor the weather patterns have constantly changed in 1960s my father was bailing hay at mundura station jerildera October in the eighties I baled hay in the same paddock in dec the same paddock was jan 2010
the same senerio seem to apply to the fruit its getting later when fruit is being picked
aint worrying me to mutch like hard work it aint getting any hotter than the 60 cause it was on ray foxs back veranda it was 110 degrees I was carting little bales off hay
the weather is one thing that the human race has got no control over what so ever anyone that says otherwise is full of crap and corupion neil
 

facthunter

Well-Known Member
#35
Less and less people are thinking like you do neil and plenty of them are farmers. We know what Coal mine owners want, and spend plenty of time and money, trying to get it, but they obviously couldn't give a stuff for what others think and care about. ALL they care about is $$$'s . A proposed new open cut mine near Gloucester was rejected by the Court in the last few days as it was determined to NOT be in the community's interest. People have had enough of deniers and mines that remain to be a blight on the landscape forever when they aren't put into a fit shape to do "anything" with after the profits have been made. The least they could do is make it reasonable afterwards but they don't... Nev
 

Litespeed

Well-Known Member
#37
The pristine lakes in Tasmania's world heritage areas are actually some of the most polluted on the planet from airborne lead, cadmium and other heavy metals from unrehabilitated mines. All from Queenstown and similar mine disasters.
 

pmccarthy

Well-Known Member
#38
The pristine lakes in Tasmania's world heritage areas are actually some of the most polluted on the planet from airborne lead, cadmium and other heavy metals from unrehabilitated mines. All from Queenstown and similar mine disasters.
Lead and cadmium? The Mt Lyell mine at Queenstown is a copper mine.
 

Marty_d

Well-Known Member
#39
The pristine lakes in Tasmania's world heritage areas are actually some of the most polluted on the planet from airborne lead, cadmium and other heavy metals from unrehabilitated mines. All from Queenstown and similar mine disasters.
Like the Little Blue Lake up near Derby - visited it a few weeks ago. Looks spectacular but signs all around it warn against swimming, due to the heavy metals that cause the colour.
Little Blue Lake
 

nomadpete

Well-Known Member
#40
Regarding Little Blue Lake....

"When the miners packed their bags and left town, the pit was filled with water to become a recreational spot."

This is not a real lake. It is in north east Tasmania, not Queenstown (which is a real environmental mess). This one is an old open cut tin mine pit that was never restored. It has walls up to 10mtrs high and is not likely to be very recreational.

I've seen Mary Kathleen uranium mine pit in Queensland, which is an even brighter blue. And numerous coal mines. Mining profits never seem to get used to restore sites properly. Same goes for logging industry.

I believe the real lakes are clean.
 
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